Router

Actually it’s the Remoterig Control box (RRC or “the box”) that has to interact with the router in order to communicate with the remote radio base RRC.

In order for the local RRC (you) to send and receive data from the remote RRC (the radio base) through the router and internet the local RRC  must have a unique identifier so that the router can send received data to you and not to some other computer on you local area network (LAN).

There are two basic ways to accomplish this. You need to choose one or the other – NOT BOTH

  • The simplest is to create a DMZ (aka Demilitarized Zone) in your router to pass ALL server-type data (the local RRC acts like a server) to you. The limitation is that you cannot run any other server-type applications on your LAN. Because the router sends data to you untouched it cannot protect you from hacking. Normally this should not be a major concern, but the potential is there. You choose.
    • You need to get into your router menu and set up a DHCP Reservation. This reserves a single IP address for your RRC. Frequently the router will require the MAC address listed in our RRC as a unique identifier.
    • Once you get your IP address assigned, then you set up your DMZ with that address.
    • Pau

 

  • The second way is more complicated but more secure. It is the only way if you intend to run server applications on your LAN as I do.
    • You need to get into your router menu and set up a DHCP Reservation. This reserves a single IP address for your RRC. Frequently the router will require the MAC address listed in our RRC as a unique identifier.
    • Once your IP address is reserved, you need to direct the router to deliver received data sent to you as identified by specific reserved ports. RRCs require five (5) ports. This technique is called Port Forwarding.
    • An example:
      • Using DHCP reservation to get a local IP address: 192.168.1.123
      • Using Port Forwarding, forward five ports to address 192.168.1.123. Click on HUNA for port numbers.
    • The result is when your router receives data for any of the five ports, it will direct it to your IP address; all other data will be treated as normal web traffic (ex: to your browser, email, etc.).

One last step is to disable the SIP option on your router. It has been reported to sometimes interfere with the audio sent back and forth, i.e. your SSB QSO. So diable it.

All this is in the RRC manual.

232 total views, 2 views today